Lifehouse…

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“Lifehouse is the brainchild of singer-songwriter-guitarist Jason Wade, who started the band in 1996 with bassist Sergio Andrade. Lifehouse is based in Los Angeles, where Wade settled after stints in Portland and Seattle.” Richard De La Font Agency

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“Lifehouse’s debut single was a grunge-pop sleeper hit that wound up being the Hot 100’s top song of 2001 – on the chart for nearly every week of the year, despite never hitting Number One. It peaked at Number Two in the summer, held off by the Moulin Rouge soundtrack’s cover of ‘Lady Marmalade.'” Rolling Stone

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“Jason Wade, whose mother sang and played guitar with a folk-pop trio in the ’70s – got his first guitar and began writing songs at 12, after his parents split up. Among his influences are Pearl Jam, Nirvana, Paul Simon and The Beatles. The discipline he brings to his craft is also reflected in his extra-musical activities: Wade is a black belt in the martial art of Du Ye Chi Tao.” Richard De La Font Agency

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“Lifehouse emerged in the early 2000s with a commercial blend of pop/rock melody and throaty, post-grunge vocals. Wade, who originally tagged the band Blyss upon its inception in 1996, was raised by missionary parents in a variety of locales. He eventually settled in Los Angeles with his mother and took a keen interest in songwriting. Sergio lived next door, and the two spent hours in Wade’s garage, fine-tuning their original compositions and laying the brickwork for Lifehouse’s accessible sound. Those rehearsals paved the way for a self-released album, Diff’s Lucky Band, as well as a series of shows at church worship services. Lifehouse resisted the temptation to become a full-fledged Christian band, however, and instead signed a contract with Dreamworks Records as an alternative rock trio. Drummer Jon Palmer completed the lineup.” Rovi-Andrew Leahey

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So, is Lifehouse a Christian band? Here’s how Jason has answered the question: “We are not a ‘Christian band,’ but I’m a Christian, and the bass player [Sergio] is a Christian,” Jason told UCLA’s Daily Bruin Online.

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And then in a Rolling Stone magazine interview, Jason said, “My music is spiritually based, but we don’t want to be labeled as a ‘Christian band,’ because all of a sudden people’s walls come up and they won’t listen to your music and what you have to say.”

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“Many of Wade’s lyrics address issues of self-discovery and spiritual seeking, areas of exploration that have further bonded him to his fans. He views the name of the band as a metaphor for his music.” Richard Da La Font Agency

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“”No Name Face’ marked the band’s official debut in the fall of 2000. The album enjoyed double-platinum sales on the strength of “Hanging by a Moment,” which was the most played radio track of 2001. In a market dominated by teen pop, Lifehouse stood out as champions of guitar-based music, and their unexpected success drew them back inside the studio to work on a follow-up album. With Brendan O’Brien handling production duties, Wade led his band through the recording of Stanley Climbfall during the spring and summer of 2002. The record was released on Dreamworks the following September, but it failed to match the sales of its predecessor. Lifehouse’s lineup splintered soon after, with Andrade exiting the group to pursue alternate projects.” Rovi-Andrew Leahey

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“Wade pieced together a revised Lifehouse and returned in early 2005 with a self-titled third album. For the touring that followed its release, Wade and percussionist Rick Woolstenhulme, Jr. were joined by former AM Radio bassist/vocalist Bryce Soderberg, who remained with the group for its return to alternative rock on 2007’s Who We Are.” Rovi-Andrew Leahey

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“Lifehouse and Who We Are proved to be fairly popular releases, with both albums going gold thanks to a trio of Top 40 singles: “First Time,” “You and Me,” and “Whatever It Takes.” Smoke & Mirrors appeared three years later, sporting a collaboration with rapper/songwriter Kevin Rudolf on the leadoff single “Halfway Gone.” Debuting at number six on the Billboard Top 200, Smoke & Mirrors was a successful record and, after a supporting tour, the group entered the studio once again with producer Jude Cole (he helmed S&M) to record its sixth album. Entitled Almeria, the record appeared in December 2012; it was preceded by the single “Between the Raindrops,” a duet with pop singer Natasha Bedingfield. Almeria didn’t make many waves on the charts — it reached 55 on Billboard’s Top 200, whereas Smoke & Mirrors peaked at number six — and the group didn’t support it with a tour.’ Rovi-Andrew Leahey

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“After a year and a half apart, they reconvened to go through all of the compositions Wade had accrued, and when Woolstenhulme and Soderberg recorded their parts on top of his demos, the songs “started to breathe and jump-start.” And gradually—over the course of six months, a much longer time than Lifehouse’s usual recording process—an album began to take shape. But the genesis of these songs remained present and gave them a different feel than what the band had grown used to.” band website

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“The biggest thing was having the freedom to reset and start over,” says Wade. “Thinking that this was going to be a solo record got us way outside of the box that people put us in. I had been experimenting with songs bordering on country, some are a little more singer-songwriter, something like ‘Alien’ is a little more playful. It allowed us the freedom to get outside of one genre.”” band website

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“This tour to promote Out Of The Wasteland is a chance to reinforce their commitment to give the loyal fans the Lifehouse sound that so many craved on previous album Almeria.” the Mirror

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“Rockers Lifehouse have gone indie for its latest album. That means a lot more work for the band – but also discovering fans in unexpected places.” Star 2

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“American rock band Lifehouse is hot off the heels of its new album “Out of the Wasteland,” where the band reportedly returned to its roots and produced songs reminiscent of its old hit ‘Hanging by a Moment.'” Christian Today

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“What is your favorite song on the album? I love ‘Flight.’ I think ‘Flight’ really was a breakthrough for me. I really needed to write something that kind of inspired, that felt like some of my favorite Lifehouse songs like ‘Broken,’ ‘Everything,’ ‘Storm’… Songs that really have that deeper meaning and really have that trademark Lifehouse sound, where it starts out kind of slow but it builds up to that climactic ending. Just going into the studio one day… I really had this sense of urgency that I wanted to write something special, but I was forcing it all day. I started two or three songs, threw all of them away, and right when I was about to call it a day and give up, I sat down at the piano and it was this really magical moment where I was kind of channeling the song — it was just there. Those moments only happen every couple of years, and I really treasure them.” Pop Crush

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“For Lifehouse, Out Of The Wasteland is a culmination of their life’s work, a new chapter that serves as the pay-off for having the patience to reconnect with the musical and personal chemistry that took them to the top. “We were at crossroads, and it definitely could have gone a different way,” says Jason Wade. “Going through changes and restarting a brand new season in your life and your career can be scary. But I think everybody is really happy that right now, our hearts are in the right place creatively.” band website

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Diff’s Lucky Day (1999) [released under the band name of Blyss]
No Name Face (2000)
Stanley Climbfall (2002)
Lifehouse (2005)
Who We Are (2007)
Smoke & Mirrors (2010)
Almería (2012)
Out of the Wasteland (2015)

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Links to publications from my cohorts-in-the-pit:

http://www.pep.ph/guide/photos/8296/lifehouse-member-tells-filipinos-our-favorite-place-to-play-in-the-world-is-manila

http://pop.inquirer.net/2015/10/in-photos-lifehouse-live-in-manila/

http://www.philstar.com/entertainment/2015/10/09/1508867/photos-lifehouse-live-manila

http://cnnphilippines.com/entertainment/2015/10/09/PHOTOS-Lifehouse-live-in-Manila.html

http://myxph.com/photos/9108/photos-lifehouse-live-in-manila/

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